Save the date! Women Who Rock Community unConference 2015: Rocking Media Justice

WWR Save the Date 2015

Mark your calendar!

 

The Women Who Rock (WWR) Community will celebrate our 5th anniversary on Saturday, March 7th, with the 2015 WWR unConference, an event where we strive to create a space for women to participate together in discussing ways for Rocking Media Justice. The 2015 WWR unConference will take place on Saturday, March 7th at Rainier Valley Cultural Center, featuring a moderated roundtable dedicated to solidarity within organizers, roundtable discussions with the community, a skills-share space, where attendees can float from booth to booth, collecting different methods for rocking media justice, a cypher, and a community-created altar.

Stay tuned for the 2015 WWR unConference poster! Coming soon…

For now, here are some juicy deets on the events of the 2o15’s unConference:

Saturday’s events::
Musical Brigade
Intergenerational Roundtable Discussion
Skill Swap Bazaar
5th Anniversary CAKE
Cypher

Sharing is caring! Share WWR Facebook photos and use our Twitter hashtags to get the word out.

#WWR2015 #WWRRockingMediaJustice

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Save the Date! 2014 Women Who Rock: Making Scenes, Building Communities unConference

Save the date for the 4th annual Women Who Rock:  Making Scenes, Building Communities unConference.  Altar Building, Art Bazaar, Film Festival, and more!  Special guest performer Evelyn Harris @ 8pmFriday, April 25, 2014.  Evelyn Harris event held in conjunction with the EMP Pop Music Conference 2014.

All Ages!  Babies & Children Welcome!

All events free at Historic Washington Hall in Seattle’s Central District @ 153 14th Avenue Seattle, Washington 98122. Bring cash for food and arts bazaar.

April 25th unConference schedule @  http://wp.me/PXEE5-RI

Check for updates @ WOMENWHOROCKCOMMUNITY.ORG

Tumblr @ womenwhorockconference.tumblr.com

Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/womenwhorockcommunity

Twitter @womenwhorock206

Questions? Email womenwhorockproject@gmail.com

Please contact us if you’d like to volunteer!

Be part of the Women Who Rock planning collective for our April 24th film festival, community altar, crafts bazaar, cypher jam, music showcase and special guest speaker event! Bring a friend!

Please help spread the word by inviting your friends, FB or in person! Our special honored keynote guest is Evelyn Harris, formerly of Sweet Honey in the Rock!

More info @ womenwhorockcommunity.org

Snacks provided!

All meetings at Historic Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave, Seattle 98122

Meetings 12 noon to 2pm. Future meeting dates:
March 2
March 16
March 30
April 6
April 13
April 20
April 25 EVENT

Questions to start the day (with a fantastic soundtrack)

Monica Rojas invites us all to think about how we participate in systems of oppression. How can we name those practices and work collectively to change them? These are useful questions for each of us: what do I do each day to challenge oppressive systems? How can I share this work with others? Who can I learn from in these efforts? How can we remember that our struggles are global?

Personally, I am finding the energy and diversity of the Women Who Rock community inspiring and energizing. The music, the dance, the bodies, and the generosity remind me again of how narrow and circumscribed life in the university can be.

Call for Sessions: “Women Who Rock: Making Scenes, Building Communities”

“Women Who Rock: Making Scenes, Building Communities”

February 17-18, 2011 at the University of Washington and Seattle University Call for Session Proposals Deadline: November 30, 2010

Women have been a powerful presence in Seattle’s well-known independent music scene, as performers, promoters, writers, DJs, archivists and fans. In many cases, they embody the hybrid identity of artist-activist-advocate. Historically, in the Pacific Northwest, women have used their music and activism to create music scenes that anchor social justice movements. The present is no different. The Women Who Rock Conference, organized by the Women Who Rock Research Project and the Women Who Rock Graduate Student Collective, will highlight both contemporary and past movement(s) in and outside of Seattle by bringing together musicians, activists, writers, advocates, educators, and scholars to explore questions of female representation and access for women within music scenes. This conference is intended to reach an academic and public audience. Scholars and educators will contextualize their explorations of women within various music scenes by engaging broader discourses of feminist, critical race, and class analyses. Musicians, activists and others will demonstrate how innovations in the
creative arts link to social justice movements.

Photo of Sister Rosetta Tharpe, ca. 1930, © Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images 1970

This conference, which aims to be an annual event, will also introduce the initial phase of the Women Who Rock Oral History project. At the conference, we will generate contacts for future oral histories.

We invite activists, scholars, musicians and artists to submit proposals for topic-focused breakout sessions that will promote dialogue about women, music, and social justice, taking into account issues of gender, race, ethnicity, class and sexuality. We encourage session proposals that explore the ways that Chicana and Black feminist thought have expanded “who” counts as women and “what” counts as rock. In your session proposal, please include the names of facilitators, participants and/or performers; a short description of your topic; a list of the key points you would like to address in dialogue with conference attendees; and a plan for how you will address them. Group and individual session proposals will be considered. We move away from traditional panel sessions with the aim of promoting dialogue. We are particularly interested in creative, non- traditional, and/or musical session formats.
Possible topics include, but are in no way limited to:

Performing Community:
Photo of Alice Bag, ca. 1978, © Ruby Ray 1978
• The role of music scholars, critics, performers and archivists as well as Chicana and Black feminist theorists in crafting a feminist narrative of hip hop, punk, and indie rock
• Women performers and the art of DJ-ing, breakdancing, rhyming, graffiti art, vocalizing and spoken word • Building community at the intersection of Hip Hop and Indie Rock • Autonomous women-focused art collectives (ex. Mujeres de Maíz) • Queer musical practices and interventions

Making a Scene:
• Music making as a local site of feminist community-building (examples include Home Alive, B-Girl Bench, Seattle Fandango Project and others)
• The role of performers, advocates, and educators in creating musical communities • Creating a space for building connections between women in hip hop, indie rock/punk, and alternative rock
cultures that share a similar ethos but rarely connect
• Connecting the women who use music culture as a platform for pleasure and politics • Linking local music communities and transnational musical movements (de CAJóN Project , Afro-Peruvian percussion)
• Musical and creative responses to immigration debates (SB 1070) • Creating spaces of autonomous music making and sharing
• The role of community radio • Internet and social networking

Communal Archives/Oral Histories:
• The politics of the archive; the archive as a site of community-making and historical praxis • The archive as resource for performers, advocates, and scholars • The archive as foundation for digital online and museum exhibits • Presentation of oral histories
Collaborative networks of production, performance, and distribution:
• Use of digital technologies for in-home production and recording • Use of digital technologies for musical and scholarly collaboration • Music communities as a vehicle for public humanities

Please submit your session proposals by November 30, 2010. Proposals should be 500 words or less and include a description of the session format. Please also include a 50-word biography. Send proposals for sessions to quetzal@uw.edu. Group and individual proposals or performances will be considered.

Questions? Contact Quetzal Flores, quetzal@uw.edu.

Conference registration at: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/quetzal/111906

Conference organizers: Mako Fitts (fittsm@seattleu.edu), Quetzal Flores (quetzal@uw.edu), Michelle Habell-Pallan (mhabellp@u.washington.edu), Sonnet Retman (sretman@u.washington.edu), Nicole Robert (nrobert@u.washington.edu ), Georgia M. Roberts (gmr2@u.washington.edu).

This conference is co-sponsored by the American Music Partnership of Seattle (Experience Music Project, KEXP 90.3 FM, and University of Washington), Women Studies, American Ethnic Studies, School of Music, and the Simpson Center for the Humanities at the University of Washington as well as Anthropology, Sociology, Social Work, and the Women Studies Program at Seattle University.

To download pdf version, click https://docs.google.com/fileview?id=0B8pkiYSOby_lZjU0ODlkODgtODMyOS00MDEzLWFiZjktYTM4OWZhZmVjYzlh&hl=en